October 07 , 2012

Anthony

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The Functional Movement System (FMS) completely changed the way I thought about training clients. I remember the first class I took with Behnad Honarbakhsh and having my mind blown. It was one of those experiences where you think you know something only to find out you know nothing. He opened my eyes to what was the right path to follow and I immediately became inspired to learn more and to bring these concepts to our clients.

Over the next few years I would take several courses with FMS and TPI and take those concepts in the trenches with clients from all demographics including CPGA golf professionals, amateur golfers, Crossfitters, and the general population of health and fitness. I was able to re-program and fix about 80% of the population’s movement dysfunction and ultimately improve their life but there was still that 20% that I could not help for some reason no matter what I threw at them.

I don’t know how many times I would try to apply the concepts I learned with clients only to become stumped and not make the change I thought would happen. It was like I was trying to put numbers in a formula only to find out it didn’t always add up how I thought it would. I realized that the solution to what I thought was the problem wasn’t always black and white. I started to doubt my own skills as a movement coach and I knew I needed some guidance. I needed mentorship.

It seemed as though the universe listened to my many cries and a couple of months ago I get this email invite from Behnad saying that he’s offering a unique advanced FMS mentorship to a small group on a first-reply-first-in basis. Advanced mentorship of this kind has never been done before in the FMS and this course was only offered to a small list of movement coaches. Long story short and Aaron and I get in.

There was a total of seven of us at the mentorship class which was offered one night a week over the course of three weeks. We reviewed advanced concepts we learned in previous FMS courses and we applied them over and over again in case study after case study using real-life people that were invited to the class. These people had movement dysfunction that definitely represented that 20% that I mentioned above.  Mischa Harris (The head of strength & conditioning for Team Canada Volleyball) brought in a high-level youth player for us to work with.  We also learned new concepts like the SMFA Breakouts and the Y-balance test which supplement the Functional Movement Screen. Behnad constantly challenged us saying things like “show me” then he’d step back to see what you’d do. He offered feedback, instruction, and exactly what we were all looking for. Mentorship. It was refreshing to see that all of us had been struggling with similar issues prior to the mentorship classes and there were definitely a lot of “Ah Ha!” moments throughout. Some of them were actually expressed out loud right Jena? 🙂 You can feel the group’s confidence improve over the course of the three weeks we worked together. There was also an appropriate amount of time in between classes so we could go off and apply the concepts to our clients. In the end each of us in the group became further inspired by what we learned together and a camaraderie between us all was created.

If you are a strength coach, personal trainer, or clinician that uses the FMS on a daily basis and perhaps you’ve been struggling with some of the concepts, then I highly recommend the Advanced FMS Mentorship by Fit to Train. These guys are top notch.

Metaphorically speaking, there is a lot of dysfunction out there in terms of training and therapy practices. Most everybody has the best intentions but a lot of the problem is that people just don’t know. They get into the bubble of what they know and they don’t bother to look outside that bubble to improve themselves as coaches, trainers or clinicians. I believe it’s important to expand your knowledge and don’t get stuck in that bubble. For example: If you’re a Crossfit coach, there is more out there than just the Crossfit certification MWOD to identify and correct movement dysfunction.  Take an FMS course perhaps.  If you’re an FMS movement coach already, maybe take a Crossfit MWOD cert or a certification from TPI. If you’re following the TPI advanced tracks, take an FMS certification. You get the idea… We have a responsibility to provide our clients with the best that’s out there so Google it, find out what that is, and use it to help your clients.

On behalf of the movement coaches in our group I want to say thanks Behnad and Mon Jef for your mentoring and your continued work to remove the dysfunction in our industry one strength coach, personal trainer, and clinician at a time.

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